Game

Red Food, Green Food

Learners play a modified game of Red Light, Green Light (Red Food, Green Food) to identify fit food choices.

Children moving for active game - Sanford fit

Key Message

Healthy food choices are your body’s best fuel to go, grow, and know!

Objectives

  1. Identify food as fuel for their body and brain.
  2. Identify fruits, vegetables, protein, whole grains, milk, and water as fit food choices that give their bodies the most power to move and think.
  3. Apply a variety of locomotor skills to game play.

Preparation

  • Safety: Allow enough space to move freely and minimize collisions. Determine boundaries that are a safe distance from obstacles and walls.
  • Determine how you will group learners, using best practice guidelines from the Teacher's Guide.
  • Separate food cards into smaller sets of 10 (five green-light cards and five red-light cards) for  each group of learners.
  • Section play area into six to eight areas for the activity.
  • Be prepared to demonstrate fitBoost brain break activity and fitFlow yoga.

Warm Up

Begin with a fitBoost.

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Captivate

Say: Show your choice for each “Would you rather...?” question.

  1. You have a friend over, and you are reaching for a snack. Would you rather eat a vegetable or a fruit? Do squats as if picking vegetables or jump high as if picking fruit from a high tree branch.

  2. You are on a walk with your family. Would you rather have enough energy to move as fast as an antelope or  little energy and move as slowly as a sloth? Run fast (in place) for an antelope or in slow motion for a sloth.

  3. You are thirsty after a soccer game. Would you rather drink milk or water? Pretend to walk like a cow for milk or swim like a fish for water.

Educate

Food is your body’s fuel! The better your fuel choices, the better your energy to move and think. You can think of red and green stoplights to help you make the best food choices. 

Eat More: Green-light foods are best! They have the most nutrition for energy and growth and can be eaten anytime. Green-light foods are great fuel for your body and brain, so eat them often! Examples: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat milk, and lean meat.

Eat Some: Yellow-light foods do not keep you fueled up the way green-light foods do. They have more fat, added sugar, and/or calories than green-light foods. Eat yellow-light foods sometimes, but not for every meal. Examples: low-fat ice cream, pasta, fruit juice, fruits in syrup, cheese sauce, peanut butter, and white rice.

Eat Less: Red-light foods have the lowest nutritional value. Stop and think about your choice and eat the red-light foods least often. Examples: chips, candy, fried foods, cakes, donuts, and soda. 

The number one thing you need to know is that green-light foods give you the most nutrition! There are no “good” foods or “bad” foods, but eating more green-light foods is always a fit choice.

Today we are going to play a game to help us know which foods are green-light foods and which are red-light foods so we can make fit food choices.

Activate

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  1. Play Red Food, Green Food at three levels of difficulty. To maximize participation, groups of three to six players play simultaneously.

  2. To begin, announce a locomotor movement for learners to demonstrate while they are moving for green lights. No movements are associated with the red lights.

  3. Play each level for 3–5 minutes. 

  4. Alternate leaders for each level.Game play levels:
  • Level 1: When the leader says “green light,” learners hop (or teacher-selected movement) toward the leader. “Red light” means don’t move. If a player moves for red light, they return to the starting point.
  • Level 2: Determine green-light/go” movement. Leader draws a food card and says the food name along with the color. Green-light foods are go; red-light foods are stop.
  • Level 3: Determine green-light/go movement. Leader names a food (without a card) and participants decide for themselves whether it is a green-light food or a red-light food.

       5. If time allows, rotate groups and repeat levels 2 and 3.

Close the Lesson

  1. Partner learners.

  2. Select a fitFlow card and complete poses.

  3. While stretching, discuss green-light food/drink choices for snacks and meals. What are the learners’ favorite green-light foods?

  4. Discuss influencers of green-light and red-light food choices at home and at school.

  5. Assess understanding with the following questions:

    Q: How does the food you eat affect your body and brain?
    A: Healthy food choices give your body the best power to move and think.

    Q: What are some of your favorite green-light foods?
    A: Name specific fruits, vegetables, protein, whole grains, milk, or water.

    Q: How would you explain the difference between green-light and red-light foods to a friend?
    A: Green-light foods give you the best energy to go, grow, and know.

    Q: What green-light foods will you choose at breakfast, lunch, snack, or your evening meal?
    A: Name specific fruits, vegetables, protein, whole grains, milk, or water.

  6. Use the Assessment Rubric (see Teacher's Guide) as a checklist to
     assess understanding, skill development, and personal responsibility.

Challenge

What is your favorite green-light food?

What You'll Need

Resources

Materials
  • fitBoost Cards
  • fitFlow Yoga Cards

Health Education Standards

  • Standard 1: Core concepts-Self-control and impulse-control strategies
  • Standard 2: Analyze Influences
  • Standard 4: Interpersonal Communication 
  • Standard 5: Decision-Making

Social and Emotional Learning Competencies

  • Self-Awareness
  • Self Management
  • Responsible Decision-Making

Extend the Lesson

  • The fit unit, Be Thoughtful About Healthy Food Choices, provides multimedia lessons, activities, and challenges to help learners recognize healthy food choices.
  • Post a diagram of MyPlate to guide learners to identify different food choices.


Adaptations and Modifications